Frederick Charles Cartlidge

Belfast-born Lance Sergeant Frederick Charles Cartlidge served with 1st Battalion Irish Guards when he died on 30th January 1944 during the Battle of Anzio.

Lance Sergeant

Frederick Charles Cartlidge

2722791

Lance Sergeant Frederick Charles Cartlidge from Belfast, Co. Antrim died during the Battle of Anzio as he served with 1st Battalion Irish Guards in the Second World War.

Lance Sergeant Frederick Charles Cartlidge (2722791) served in 1st Battalion Irish Guards during World War Two. He was the eldest son of William Percy Cartlidge and Mary Emily Cartlidge of 6 Earl Haig Park, Belfast, Co. Antrim.

Before the war, Frederick worked for the Belfast Co-Operative Society in the dairy department. He enlisted in 1940, and by the time of his had been injured twice in North Africa and Mentioned in Despatches.

A younger brother, Thomas Cartlidge of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers died in North Africa. He received the Military Medal for the gallantry shown in the engagement in which he lost his life.

Frederick died in fierce fighting on 30th January 1944 during the Battle of Anzio. He was 23 years old. Beginning on 22nd January 1944, Cartlidge took part in Operation Shingle, an amphibious landing as part of the Battle of Anzio. The aim was to establish a beachhead and aid the Allied advance on Rome.

Alan Whicker, working at Anzio for the BBC referred to the aftermath of the operation as one of the Allies “greatest blunders” of World War Two. They faced strong opposition with limited resources and lost many men.

Frederick Charles Cartlidge’s grave is in Section IV, Row J, Grave 9 of Anzio War Cemetery, Italy. His headstone bears the inscription:

Deep in our hearts, he is living yet. We loved him too dearly to ever forget.

Frederick lies next to fellow Irish Guards Lance Corporal William Samuel Johnston and Guardsman John O’Neill.

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