Carlton Stokes Goodenough

Flight Sergeant Carlton Stokes Goodenough served in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He was killed on 16th March 1942 and buried in Belfast City Cemetery.

Flight Sergeant

Carlton Stokes Goodenough

R/62738

Flight Sergeant Carlton Stokes Goodenough served in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He was killed on 16th March 1942 and buried in Belfast City Cemetery.

Flight Sergeant Carlton Stokes Goodenough (R/62738) served as a navigator in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War Two. He flew with RAF 108 Squadron based in Northern Ireland.

Before joining the RCAF, Goodenough was a teacher with seven year’s experience in the classroom. He attended McGill University in Montreal from 1933. In 1937, he married Margaret Bagley of East Angus, Quebec and the couple had a son, Thomas, in 1938. Thomas passed away in 2005.

RAF 108 Squadron in Egypt

Imperial War Museum Photo: CM 3386 (Part of the Air Ministry Second World War Official Collection). Consolidated Liberator Mark II, AL574 ‘O’, one of the handful of Liberators operated by No. 108 Squadron RAF in the Middle East at this time, parked on a dispersal pan at Fayid, Egypt, with its crew standing in front. Copyright Official RAF Photographer.

Goodenough enlisted in July 1940 and by April 1941 was in the United Kingdom with the Royal Air Force.

Liberator AL577 crash

On 16th March 1942, he was a passenger on board Liberator AL577 when it crashed in Ireland. The plane was on a transport flight carrying nineteen men from RAF 108 Squadron from Egypt to RAF Hurn in Dorset, England. Goodenough was 28 years old.

After crossing the French coast on their way to England, the crew first ran into problems. They had acknowledged reports of bad weather but had not turned back towards Egypt as requested.

Grave of Flight Sergeant Goodenough

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone of Canadian Flight Sergeant Carlton Stokes Goodenough in Belfast City Cemetery. Photo taken on 20th May 2017. Copyright Scott Edgar – World War Two Northern Ireland.

Instead, the American bomber veered off course over the East coast of Ireland. Seeing city lights, the crew believed they were over Dublin and made for RAF Greencastle in Co. Down. By then, they were in terrible weather conditions and running low on fuel.

At around 1410hrs, Liberator AL577 came down on Slieve na Glogh on the Cooley Peninsula in Co. Louth. Thirteen others lost their lives in the crash.

Remembering the victims of AL577

Flight Sergeant Goodenough’s grave is in Glenalina Extension, Section AS, Grave 123, Belfast City Cemetery, Co. Antrim. He was the son of Wright E Goodenough and Eva Stokes Goodenough of Bury, Quebec, Canada.

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