May

During World War Two, May 1941 marked the end of the Belfast Blitz and May 1945 the end of the war in Europe but much more happened in Northern Ireland.

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4th May

On 4th May 1941, Luftwaffe bombers took off from Nazi airfields. By the end of The Fire Raid of the Belfast Blitz, many parts of the city were in flames.

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6th May

On 6th May, we remember those with connections to Ulster who died at home, across the United Kingdom, and throughout the world during the Second World War.

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7th May

On 7th May 1941, the Luftwaffe carried out a 2nd night of bombing in Greenock, Renfrewshire. Among the dead were Spences and Coyles with Ulster heritage.

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8th May

8th May 1945 was Victory in Europe Day or VE Day and across Ulster, locals and service personnel celebrated the end of the Second World War in Europe.

9th May

On 9th May, we remember those with connections to Northern Ireland who lost their lives on that day in history throughout the years of the Second World War.

10th May

Remembering those with connections to Northern Ireland and Ulster who served during the Second World War and died on 10th May throughout history.

11th May

Remembering those with connections to Ulster and Northern Ireland who died on 11th May during the years 1939 to 1945 throughout the Second World War.

12th May

Remembering those with connections to Ulster or Northern Ireland who served in the Second World War and died on 12th May throughout the years of the war.

13th May

On 13th May each year, we remember those men and women with connections to Northern ireland who lost their lives serving on land, on sea, and in the air.

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14th May

On 14th May 1945, the first Nazi U-Boats entered Lough Foyle to offer their unconditional surrender to Admiral Sir Max Horton at Lisahally, Co. Londonderry.

15th May

On 15th May 1943, Bristol Beaufort EL131 crashed at Castledawson, Co. Londonderry killing all 5 crew members including Australian and New Zealander airmen.

16th May

On 16th May 1940, 2nd Battalion Royal Ulster Rifles lost Robert Fulton and William Harkness Hamilton during action along the railway in Louvain, Belgium.

17th May

General Eisenhower, the Supreme Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces in Great Britain landed at Greencastle Airfield, Co. Down on 17th May 1944.

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18th May

On 18th May 1944, American General Dwight D Eisenhower continued his visit of Northern Ireland inspecting troops of the United States Army in Co. Fermanagh.

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19th May

Bangor, Co. Down was the focus of General Eisenhower's visit to Ulster on 19th May 1944. While there, he addressed the crews of USS Quincy and USS Texas.

20th May

Remembering those with connections to Ulster or Northern Ireland who lost their lives on 20th May during the 6 years of the Second World War from 1939-45.

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21st May

On 21st May 1943, War Office photographer Lieutenant Bainbridge captured a series of photos of the band of the Auxiliary Territorial Service in Belfast.

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22nd May

At least 14 crew members of HMS Gloucester with connections to Ulster died on 22nd May 1941 when the Royal Navy ship came under attack from the Luftwaffe.

23rd May

On 23rd May 1940, members of 1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers came under heavy attack at La Bassée. Edward Crangle and William Slaine died as a result.

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24th May

On 24th May 1940, 1st Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers clashed with the German Army as the enemy attempted to cross the La Bassée Canal in Pas de Calais.

25th May

On 25th May 1942, the Royal Air Force's Supermarine Spitfire BL325 crash landed in a farmer's field near Cordrain Orange Hall, Tandragee, Co. Armagh.

26th May

AMong those with connections to Northern who died on 26th May are an American GI executed after a murder trial, and a German Prisoner of War in Co. Armagh.

27th May

Remembering those with connections to Ulster, many of whom died on 27th May 1940 while serving in the British Expeditionary Force on the way to Dunkirk.

28th May

On 28th May 1940, enemy engagement intensified as 2nd Battalion Royal Ulster Rifles withdrew further toward the Dunkirk coast between Boezinge and Woesten.